I was having a discussion with an organizing colleague and friend last week about our organizing businesses. This friend of mine, in addition to being a great organizing professional, is also an artist. She sees things with an artist’s eye. She has a wonderful way of placing furniture, objects, and pictures and making them enhance the room. It’s a real talent.

Our discussion revolved around clutter, of course.

We were talking about how some clients have lots and lots of clutter around them. These clients want to be organized. They know they have too much and need help figuring out what to keep, what to recycle, what to discard. They also need help deciding how to keep the things they want and need to keep. These clients still want to have a fair number of belongings around them – out and visible. For many of these individuals if something is put away, out of sight, it may as well be non-existent. They have to see it to know they have it.

Other clients tend more to the minimalist side of things. These individuals like to have completely clear counters and surfaces. The issue here can be if there is someone (like a nanny) working in the house who isn’t bothered by mail on the kitchen counter and they forget that the homeowner is completely against having anything cluttering up the space.

This is a matter of tolerance. How much clutter can you tolerate in your home?

Last week, when hurricane Irma – now tropical storm Irma – was swirling around Atlanta, I was at home. I didn’t want to go out in the wind and rain. I wanted to work at my desk but there was stuff (papers and receipts) cluttering the surface. I decided it was time for me to organize my desk top differently.

Now, I fall somewhere in between the two extremes I described above. I like to have some knick-knacks out and about but too much distracts me.
I took everything off the top of my desk. Then I made some decisions about what can stay and what I had to find a new home. It didn’t take me too long and before I knew it I was sitting at my newly organized desk. I was so happy with the results that I went on to organize my office supply closet. A few things had gotten out of place. It only took a few minutes for me to return the closet to good order.

I discovered that my tolerance level for clutter on my desk is low. In other words, I really do like and work best when my desk is clutter free. This realization has helped me be really productive this week. I can sit down and get right to whatever is on my mind to tackle.

What is your tolerance level for clutter in your home?
Is there a room or a spot in your home that you want to be completely clutter free?
Write me back – I’d love to know!

Below I’ve attached some links to some of my favorite organizing books. One of them is a book I wrote, Of course! Please note that these are affiliate links through Amazon and, at no additional cost to you, I will earn an affiliate fee if you decide to make a purchase.


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